My Self Evaluation as a Communicator

My “Listening Styles Profile” results were what I expected. I came up as a “people oriented” person. My colleagues thought that was about right for me. I agree with the description that it can “interfere with proper judgement”. In my case it would not be because I am trusting, but sometimes I feel that I need to give people another chance at doing something.

The Communication Anxiety Inventory was different. I thought that I never worry too much about communicating within groups, but my sister and a colleague from my school thought otherwise. They both thought I worry and stress before engaging groups and they both felt that I was more comfortable when communicating on a one on one basis. This is what the test describes as “situational” anxiety.

I scored low on the Verbal Aggressive Scale which was right from my viewpoint and my colleagues concurred. I do not like confrontation and this results in my respecting all points of views and trying to come to a settlement that makes all the parties involved feel respected.

These test made me aware of the importance of listening more. This is a great asset to have in our profession as early childhood educators. The more we listen, the more we will understand the needs and goals of our families and that in turn will help us develop plans to help them achieve their goals. The other point was the importance of being respectful in our communications. It is easier to change people’s minds when we are respectful and mindful of their views, than when we are not.

I found this exercise very useful and insightful as it highlighted the areas of communication that I need to focus on in order for me to be a better and more effective communicator.

 

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4 thoughts on “My Self Evaluation as a Communicator

  1. Mary Preville says:

    Fidelis,
    I think also this was a very interesting and eye-opening exercise, It made me more aware of myself as a listener especially in my personal life and noticed I have work to do in that area.
    nice post

    mary

    Like

  2. Neketha Polley says:

    Fidelis,

    I enjoyed reading your post. From your previous posts to your blog and discussion board comments, I too would consider you as a people oriented person. I also enjoyed this assignment as it was eye-opening. We always know how we view ourselves but, when others evaluate us, it is truly interesting to notice if you were or were not as you thought you were. Thus, I would like to say that in all of us, there is always room for improvement. Much like you, I need to work on being a good listener. I am told I listen but, at times, if I am in a time crunch, I tend to rush the conversation. I would like to focus on being less impatient when trying to be an effective listener because, a part of being a true listener means not interrupting people while they talk even if I am in a time crunch.

    Neketha

    Like

  3. Takishia says:

    Fidelis,
    I agree with you about being confrontational with people, therefore I knew I would not score the best on this section as well. Do you think early childcare professional should be considered people-oriented due to working so closely with children and families? I agree with you about gaining insight about respect and listening. I am respectful but I did discover that I interrupt/finish sentences for people. I enjoy learning areas I need improvement in.

    Like

  4. Ebony O'neal says:

    Fidelis,
    Knowing our strengths in the areas of communication with others can improve our relationships both personally and professionally. Seeing the areas of opportunity signifies growth is welcomed to enhance one’s attitude and or ways. I too agree with you that respecting those we encounter is extremely important, often times the idea of respect begins in the home with the way that we speak to others, to how we treat our things, I’ve learned that you cannot force a person to show you respect, but you can refuse to be disrespected.

    Ebony

    Like

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